What's your Coyote rig?

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Enterprise65

Member
Joined
Jan 6, 2019
Messages
17
Location
Athens, Al
I'm in need of thinning the pack around our farm with ranges up to 500 yards day/night.
So let's hear what you're using rifle and optic wise because I'm new to this.
 

hh4whiskey

Member
Joined
Jan 29, 2016
Messages
6
It’s fairly simple to run 300 and in, day/night. It’s not too much more involved to poke to 500, in the day. Past 300 at night, IR and Thermal that can resolve between a calf and a coyote past 300, without some behavior hints, is a lot of $. I don‘t run a coyote rig that I expect to go past 300 much with, and my night rig will reach that far, but inside 200, is more typical at night for positive ID and resolution. AR built around a 20” 223 Wylde JP super match barrel and VXR 3-9 (for now) is day gun. Night gun is also a day deer/hog gun. Its built around an ARP 6.8 barrel, with a Trijicon accupoint 1-4 that has a Wilcox Mount for a UTM thermal to be clipped in front. I generally get to hunt some other states where it’s legal (without special permit) to hog and coyote hunt at night. Ive only killed 28 this past year, but I don’t have as much time to chase and call anymore.
 

Enterprise65

Member
Joined
Jan 6, 2019
Messages
17
Location
Athens, Al
I've not as much as spotted one at night. I hear them inside 200 yards but never see them at night with the ATN NVG scope. Grass and crops are just too high and there is no stracture to be in or chance of stand of any kind. I spot a lone coyote on rare occasion during the day but never when I can do anything about it. Last time was a few weeks ago from my bedroom window while geting dressed for work. He was in the open field across the pond about 120 yards out the morning after hay was cut. After many failed attempts I have honestly stopped trying.
 

hh4whiskey

Member
Joined
Jan 29, 2016
Messages
6
Well, at night it’s often more akin to spot and stalk like you’d do out west, but on a smaller scale. I move, glass from vantage points, move again. Find something, and ID it, move to where I can, shoot. Stuff is concealed, day or night, and you have to move or wait for them to move, to clear for ID, stalking, and shooting. That’s just how I typically do it. You can stand hunt a vantage point, just like deer, but you can move at night on coyotes....just pretend they could see you, if they looked hard. Bright moon nights, they’ll see you moving 200 yards away, if they’re looking your way.
 

Enterprise65

Member
Joined
Jan 6, 2019
Messages
17
Location
Athens, Al
Walking and stalking doesn't work on my property. You have to wait for it to come into the open, what little there is much of the year. Once the fields are plowed the deer don't venture out so the coyote don't venture in either. But like I said, gave up on it. I'm not a hunter.
 

hh4whiskey

Member
Joined
Jan 29, 2016
Messages
6
So, it’s too thick to see them past a couple hundred yards, you can’t walk, you already have some NV, you don’t hunt, and you don’t have any coyotes....but you want to know how to see them past 500 yards, shoot them to 500 yards, from your bedroom window, IF you decide to take up hunting coyotes, whenever they might show up again? ;)

LOL. I was attempting to help, based on what you asked. I realize it was a few months back, but the leaves will fall off again in the fall. From what little I know, good luck getting night (depredation) permits in AL to shoot coyotes during deer season. It’s far easier to get blessed off on in the off season.

FWIW, you can dig a post hole about 2’ deep, and mix dog food into the dirt in the bottom, and they’ll often come and dig at that dog food for days on end. Still, mostly at night.
 

Enterprise65

Member
Joined
Jan 6, 2019
Messages
17
Location
Athens, Al
We inherited this 100 acre farm and I had asked the question prior to moving in. It used to be soley a cattle farm which was how it was the last time I visited and a 500 yard shot was no issue and coyotes roamed freely and still do. Now it's 100% crops with the exception of a small clump of woods behind the house. If it's not covered in hay over waist high it's covered in soy beans or corn that prevents you from seeing any dog sized animal farther than a few yards away. I didn't grow up hunting, never been hunting and no clue how. I learn hands on with instruction so YouTube vids do nothing for me. Nobody wants to show a 41 year old guy how to hunt when they offer. What they want to do is hunt your land for you. So with that I gave up on the notion. I would have deleted the thread if the message board allowed it.
 

hh4whiskey

Member
Joined
Jan 29, 2016
Messages
6
Okay....makes more sense now. First, you’d be surprised what you can do/see in thick field cover, whether it’s hay or row crops, especially with a thermal. it does make it tough, but rows are straight, elevation is your friend, and dryer nights (like the last several) make it easier. It IS a trial and error sort of pursuit. It takes time to figure out best ways to view, get a shooting lane, what you’re seeing, and what to look for. It CAN be done with both, but while it’s a struggle with a thermal, it’s gonna be 10x as hard with regular night vision. You’ll need to get closer and or higher, regardless.
 
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